Posted tagged ‘tank’

Don’t believe me just watch

June 24, 2015

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Pattern: Minami by Emily Nora O’Neill
Yarn: Robin Turner Back to Basics Prima Pima Cotton (100% cotton)
Needles: U.S. 5 & 6 Harmony wood Options 40″ circulars

FOMO. It stands for Fear of Missing Out. When this acronym started to achieve wide usage, I understood, for the first time, something about what drives my decision-making. As they said on Arrested Development, “then at least you’ll have it.

I’m spending 2015 trying to “stash down,” use yarn I’ve got rather than buying more. And a lot of yarn that I’ve got I bought because of FOMO. Especially Tuesday Morning yarn. If it’s a nice fiber and not some crazy novelty texture, I’ll snap it up at Tuesday Morning. It feels like a “find” because the selection is essentially random and unpredictable. Better get it “just so you’ll have it, because then at least you’ll have it.”

Then it sits in my stash for two years, like this DK-weight dark green cotton. (Two years is actually a pretty short time, for me. When I first got it out to use it I could have sworn it was only one year, because I still had it mentally filed as a recent acquisition.) The color is not calibrated to inspire me … doesn’t feel springy or summery. Earlier this year I moved it to the “for sale or trade” section of my stash on Ravelry and threw it in the “sell or give away” basket in my physical stash storage.

When I got the email from Berroco with this free pattern, though, I immediately went looking to see if I had any yarn that would work for it. And suddenly this useless yarn acquired a shape in my mind, the shape of this lace tank.

I modified the pattern to work it in the round, rather than in front and back pieces; that meant eliminating four stitches (the ones that would have been eaten up by seaming) and adding a purl column on each side for a faux seam. It also meant working this lace pattern on the right side only, which wouldn’t usually be a problem since wrong side rows are usually just purling back; knit across instead, same thing. Except this lace pattern is what they call “lace knitting” which means it’s got decreases and increases on every row, including the wrong side. So I had to figure out what decreases to use to get the same look working them from the right side. A couple of times I dropped a stitch in the lace, a scary thing when every row is patterned, but in both cases it was in the very regular lace border, not that meandering central part, and I laddered it back up like a champ.

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Best of all was the photo shoot. It fit perfectly. And that’s even more special than usual, because this fit was on my new 30-pounds-lighter frame. I’ve been sticking to a calorie budget (using MyFitnessPal) since December 12, 2014, and only have 5 pounds left to go to my goal. I went out last week and bought new clothes for the first time in a couple of years because my pants were all falling off of me. I didn’t take any deliberate “before” pictures, and although I can easily see the difference, I don’t think it’s all that dramatic to the casual observer; I carry my weight, I suppose, by just being slightly thicker everywhere, so it’s like I’ve been whittled down all around. But maybe you can see it. Here’s before:

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And after:

I’ll write more about the reducing process over on the other blog sometime soon. Here it’s all about the handknits. Just look at this thing. Yarn acquired for no good reason (really, for a very bad one), redeemed. My favorite kind of knitting story.

I’m sizzling like an isotope

September 26, 2008
From Toxophily

Pattern: Squidge Cloth by Sasha
Yarn: El. D. Mouzakis Butterfly Super 10 (100% mercerized cotton), colorway Cobalt
Needles: U.S. 6 aluminum

On Monday I sent my two handknit facecloths to school with Archer — my contribution to the spa basket the second grade is providing for the school’s silent auction. Here’s the second one, which I completed last week. Easy alternating knit-purl checkerboard pattern, but a very nice result — a squooshy, luxurious-feeling cloth with an exfoliating texture.

From Toxophily

I’m glad I chose to do two different styles of cloth: one elegant and pretty, one that looks and feels like personal pampering. I hope the two help bring in a high price at the event, along with all the other bath products that second-grade parents will be donating.

From Toxophily

And because I can’t stand to have nothing but fingering-weight projects on the needles, here’s the Drop-Stitch Lace Tank (from Stefanie Japel’s Fitted Knits that I started up this week. Extensive research convinced me that (a) I have enough Berroco Love It in the stash to make the medium size; and (b) I’d rather use it for this than for the ribbed tank I had previously selected.

From Toxophily

This is only the second women’s garment I’ve knitted, and although I plunged in with confidence, fit is always a concern. The size I’m making should have 8-9 inches of negative ease. For non-knitters, that means that its diameter is going to be 8-9 inches smaller than my own, and therefore it will have to stretch to accommodate me. No worries that it’s stretchy enough to do that — it’s extremely stretchy — but of course that makes it form-fitting. (You know — a Fitted Knit.) And for a woman who hasn’t been to the gym more than a couple of times in the month of September, that’s a daunting prospect.

The tank is knit as two rectangles with ribbing for shaping, with the front split for a neckline. I’m a couple of repeats past the split on the right side, and it’s going very fast. Stay tuned for the thrill of seaming!